Neo-Classic

Six years ago I wrote about towing with 1985 Chevy Suburban. It was 23 years old then. Now it is 29, but is still not considered vintage or collectible. Instead, it is called “neo-classic.”

Colorado legislated that only cars made prior to 1975 are collectible. Just last year that was revised and now any car more than 32 years old is collectible (vintage). I envy the pre-1975 group. No emissions controls. No emission testing, and they can modify their engines without permission. The only catch is that those vehicles can not be driven more than 4,500 miles a year, and that is on the honor system. The neo-classics are between a rock and a hard place.

We still have to pass emissions testing even though in most cases we don’t use our cars any differently than the pre-1975 group. And before anyone flames me, let me say that I’m not against passing an emissions test. I don’t want pollution anymore than anyone else. It’s just that I feel stuck using 1985 pollution equipment – vacuum hoses, air pump, etc. There are after-market options, but I can’t change any of the equipment unless I first submit and have a proposal approved by the Air Care Colorado engineers. Unlike the pre-1975 group, the neo-classics are at their mercy.

It might sound as though I’m whining, but two years ago I was held hostage at the Envirotest emissions test center for 45 minutes. The employees refused to give my vehicle an emissions test because they thought I’d removed emissions equipment. They couldn’t find a catalytic converter. That’s because it has never had one. And it wasn’t just that they didn’t believe me. It was their attitude. They were angry with me and acted as if I was poisoning the planet. One yelled at me to mind my own business and return to the waiting area. Eventually, they tested the Burb and it passed the test, but even then they were sullen about it and never apologized for the way they’d treated me.

Complicating the problem is that it is so hard now to find anyone experienced in tuning an engine equipped with a carburetor. This year I found one that I want to recommend, The Carburetor Shop in Englewood, Colorado. They rebuilt my carb and tuned up the Burb for a reasonable price and now it runs better than ever. Friendly, fast, courteous and competent – it doesn’t get any better than that.

I was still apprehensive about this years emissions test. I was confident the Burb would pass, but not about how I’d be treated. Once again one of the employees seemed skeptical. His distain was obvious but this time his attitude changed as the testing progressed. He was surprised by the results and this time I wasn’t held hostage.

It occurs to me that maybe my old car is the exception instead of the rule. That would explain some of the attitude. The manager at the Carburetor Shop thanked me for having such a clean engine. The technician at Envirotest congratulated me and encouraged me to continue keeping the Burb in good condition.

Well, I am encouraged. So much so, that I’m looking forward to 2017 when the Burb will be eligible for collector plates.

My 1985 Suburban, "The Beast," with my32' 1986 Airstream Excella.

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About the Author

Hi, my name is Forrest McClure. I've been writing for the magazine since its inception. My wife and I travel with our 1966 20' Globe Trotter or our 1986 32' Excella. So, my primary interest is vintage travel trailers.